The Scriptures Speak About Jesus!

Why did Jesus after his resurrection choose not to go and show himself to those who crucified him? Well that thought is a temptation. Because the devil while tempting him had said, “If you are the Son of God (Matthew 4:3, 6),” then do this. But Jesus turned his attention to “It is written (Matthew 4:4, 7, 10).”

Again while Jesus was on the Cross, people hurled insults at him, shaking their heads and saying, “Come down from the cross, if you are the Son of God (Matthew 27:40)!” That again was a huge temptation. But even at that time Jesus was thinking about fulfilling the Scriptures; all that was written about him (John 19:28).

After resurrection we find Jesus repeatedly turning the attention of his disciples to the Scriptures. He told them that the Scriptures speak about him. What Moses wrote in the law, what the prophets wrote, and what mostly David wrote in the Psalms speak about him (Luke 24:27, 44).

The two disciples who traveled to Emmaus said that their hearts were burning within them as they listened to Jesus while he opened the Scriptures to them (Luke 24:32. See also v. 45).

Three thoughts stand out here. One, Jesus’ high regard for the Scriptures. He many times said it forcefully (Matthew 24:35). What is your estimate about God’s Word? Is it like how Jesus viewed Scripture?

Two, the best way to understand Scripture is to put Jesus, his cross, and his resurrection as central. Then the Scripture will come alive. Those who seek after blessings alone from Jesus miss the core of the gospel.

Three, you cannot have any meaningful relationship with Jesus Christ unless you value the Scriptures which Jesus so highly valued.

To sum up, Jesus did not show himself to the world but only his disciples after his resurrection. But even then he wanted them to understand Scripture; especially how they all pointed to him.

What is the relevance of all this to you today? Hope someone will ask this question to you: “Do you understand what you are reading (Acts ,8:30)?”

But sad to say; that question my friend can only be asked to those who read the Scriptures? Do you!

Insight
The Wicker Basket
The story is told of an old man who lived on a farm in the mountains of eastern Kentucky with his young grandson. Each morning, Grandpa was up early sitting at the kitchen table reading from his old worn-out Bible. His grandson who wanted to be just like him tried to imitate him in any way he could. One day the grandson asked, “Papa, I try to read the Bible just like you but I don’t understand it, and what I do understand I forget as soon as I close the book. What good does reading the Bible do?”

The Grandfather quietly turned from putting coal in the stove and said, “Take this old wicker coal basket down to the river and bring back a basket of water.” The boy did as he was told, even though all the water leaked out before he could get back to the house. The grandfather laughed and said, “You will have to move a little faster next time,” and sent him back to the river with the basket to try again.

This time the boy ran faster, but again the old wicker basket was empty before he returned home. out of breath, he told his grandfather that it was “impossible to carry water in a basket,” and he went to get a bucket instead. The old man said, “I don’t want a bucket of water; I want a basket of water. You can do this. You’re just not trying hard enough,” and he went out the door to watch the boy try again.

At this point, the boy knew it was impossible, but he wanted to show his grandfather that even if he ran as fast as he could, the water would leak out before he got far at all. The boy scooped the water and ran hard, but when he reached his grandfather the basket was again empty. Out of breath, he said, “See Papa, it’s useless!” “So you think it is useless?” The old man said, “Look at the basket.”

The boy looked at the basket and for the first time he realized that the basket looked different. Instead of a dirty old wicker coal basket, it was clean.

“Son, that’s what happens when you read the Bible. You might not understand or remember everything, but when you read it, it will change you from the inside out.”

Moral of The Wicker Basket story: Take time to read a portion of God’s word each day; it will affect you for good even if you don’t retain a word.
—Author Unknown

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